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The Human Face of InfoGov

Solution marketeers and alarmist analysts love to flash the red lights of litigation support and audit compliance when making the case for information governance. But the problem with this is that neither of these reasons speak to the one Really Important Motive that lies at the end of the infogov path:

To better serve/enable/empower people, be they customers, prospects, employees, or other interested parties.

Cases in Point

This point was sadly and forcibly driven home to me in recent months as I cared for two terminally-ill family members. I've already touched on a couple of examples (see When Paper Is The Best Technology and Just the Fax, Ma'am), and here a couple more:

  • The funeral home that couldn't find the pre-paid paperwork and, after being provided with my carbon copy, defended itself by saying, "oh, that was done under the old owners." As if that justified the days-long halt they called to making the final arrangements.
  • The same funeral home that couldn't find another client's file folder and sent two staffers on an obvious office search, during which they loudly asked within earshot of everybody present, "has anyone seen the [family name] file?" Privacy? We don't need no stinking privacy.
  • The hospital ICU nurse who missed a critical bit of medical information because it was recorded on a piece of paper "that is a different size and color than I've ever seen before." Apparently reading is not fundamental.
  • The rehab facility whose blood-testing machine returned a result so far from normal that the technician thought the patient must be dying or dead – only to discover that he was exhibiting no symptoms at all. Couldn't be that there was something wrong with the machine, could it? Nah – better to rush the tube-fed, dialysis patient to the emergency room instead.

I could go on, but I won't for fear of offending more sensibilities than just my own. Suffice to say that these infogov-related incidents were painful for the family and disruptive to the institutions involved, which then had to spend time and effort addressing what went wrong.

Oh the Humanity!

I'd like to say that this story has a happy ending, that the funeral home, the hospital, the rehab facility learned their lesson, but they didn't. It's clear to me that the powers-that-be in each of these places – as is the case in so many – are more concerned with being right than with doing the right thing. The shame of it is that they could make some relatively small changes in their information-handling and make life better for both themselves and their constituents. But I'm sure they won't.

And that's a shame, because, to me, THAT is what infogov is really all about.

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Steve Weissman | 617-383-4655
- The Info Gov Guy™
- Member, AIIM Company of Fellows
- Co-Founder,
Information Coalition
- Follow me on Twitter! @steveweissman

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Information Management and Backwards-Compatibility: Just the Fax, Ma’am

​What does it tell you about the latest information management disciplines that my big success this week was sending a 10-page fax to a doctor's office?

It tells me is that we should never forget that much of the world consists of people who are just trying to get stuff done – and many of these are not equipped with anything resembling the cutting-edge infogov solutions we usually focus on. (There's a much more significant example here.)

The Back Story

About a year ago, I cut the cord to my cable service, sacrificing hundreds of channels I never watched and phone services I hardly used for a high-speed Internet connection. And all was perfectly well until the other day, when I needed to send a document to my elderly father's physician and learned that they are only allowed to communicate via fax.

Lacking a phone line, I knew there was no dial tone to feed to my MFP. I also knew I didn't want to sign up for an online service (too much work considering I probably won't have to fax again for years). So I ended up buying a gadget, subscribing to a free VOIP offering, and faxed happily ever after.

The Moral

I tell this story because I don't want you to hold the same mistaken assumption I did (albeit unwittingly), which is that anyone I need to share information with lives in the same scan/PDF/email world I do. The truth is, there are plenty of technical, philosophical, economic, and legal reasons for them not to, and yet it still somehow surprised me when they surfaced.

I still firmly believe that the latest information disciplines have the power to transform our businesses, and I know they are doing so in a great many cases. But we must always remember that the old ones have a staying power of their own, and we overlook them only at our peril.

==========================
Steve Weissman | 617-383-4655
- The Info Gov Guy™
- Member, AIIM Company of Fellows
- Co-Founder, Information Coalition - Follow me on Twitter!
@steveweissman

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